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Thread: Diagnosis

  1. Red face Diagnosis

    Is there ever a chance of misdiagnosis, or is this a pretty clear diagnosis?

    I definitely have some hearing issues in my left ear. I've lost about 30%. I visited a younger doctor, but I think he was a Stanford graduate.

    It was a very quick diagnosis -- just a hearing test. I guess I'm wondering if I should get a 2nd opinion or if it doesn't really matter.

    I will probably get a CT scan as he recommended. Has anyone else done that? If so, what does that involve, and did it show otosclerosis in your results? (He said it is only visible in about half of the cases.)

    Thanks. I'm new to the forum, and while I wish no one had hearing problems, it's comforting that I'm not alone in facing these issues.

  2. #2

    Default

    A hearing test takes maybe 5 to 10 minutes. Provided that your loss is not sudden or asymmetric, there's really not much else that is required to diagnose hearing loss. It sounds like your audiologist has recommended further testing to rule out otosclerosis, which is a reasonable step. You could always get a second opinion; most audiologists will do a hearing test as part of a free hearing aid consult.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "I've lost about 30%." Usually the results of hearing tests are given as an audiogram representing hearing thresholds for each ear at various frequencies. Those are the numbers you see in many people's signatures. Loss is usually not measured as a percentage unless you're talking about calculating a partial disability. The other thing that's expressed as a percentage are scores on the Word Recognition Test (WRT).
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    My Aids: Hidden Content

  3. #3

    Default

    Why did you go to the ENT? Do you have signs and symptoms that lead you to making an appointment with an ENT?

    I have asymmetrical hearing loss. I started with an audiologist and was referred to an ENT. I had a MRI to rule out an aural neuroma (tumor on the aural nerve). You will probably spend less than an hour getting a CT Scan. The MRI took about an hour.

    So far in my journey, I have had four hearing tests. One test was a little different from the other three, but even then, they were all pretty close.

    You are correct that you are not on this journey alone. There are many people who are adjusting to hearing loss. This forum is a good resource. There are the relative "new" members, like me. There are the "experts" on here that include very experienced hearing aid wearers to audiologist. I wish you luck with your testing.
    Brad
    SRT
    70 db R/15 db L
    WR
    R 56% at 65db/L 100% at 60db

    Freq. 250 500 750 1K 1.5K 2K 3k 4k 6k 8k
    L 15 5 15 20 20 0 15 40 105 95
    R 15 35 50 55 55 50 50 60 80 100

  4. Default

    Yeah, my WRT was 96%, but my left ear was pretty much 30% below the "norm" across the board. There was a drop-off at the high frequencies, too, but the doctor was more concerned about the 30% drop across all lower frequencies.

  5. Default

    For the CT scan, is there the need for any dye -- e.g., with an injection or anything?

    Thanks!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad109 View Post
    Why did you go to the ENT? Do you have signs and symptoms that lead you to making an appointment with an ENT?

    I have asymmetrical hearing loss. I started with an audiologist and was referred to an ENT. I had a MRI to rule out an aural neuroma (tumor on the aural nerve). You will probably spend less than an hour getting a CT Scan. The MRI took about an hour.

    So far in my journey, I have had four hearing tests. One test was a little different from the other three, but even then, they were all pretty close.

    You are correct that you are not on this journey alone. There are many people who are adjusting to hearing loss. This forum is a good resource. There are the relative "new" members, like me. There are the "experts" on here that include very experienced hearing aid wearers to audiologist. I wish you luck with your testing.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jupebox View Post
    For the CT scan, is there the need for any dye -- e.g., with an injection or anything?

    Thanks!!
    That will depend on what your doctor ordered. The term CT scan with contrast is an indication that they will be using a dye. It helps to visualize some of the hard to see areas.
    Brad
    SRT
    70 db R/15 db L
    WR
    R 56% at 65db/L 100% at 60db

    Freq. 250 500 750 1K 1.5K 2K 3k 4k 6k 8k
    L 15 5 15 20 20 0 15 40 105 95
    R 15 35 50 55 55 50 50 60 80 100

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    3,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jupebox View Post
    Is there ever a chance of misdiagnosis, or is this a pretty clear diagnosis?

    I definitely have some hearing issues in my left ear. I've lost about 30%. I visited a younger doctor, but I think he was a Stanford graduate.

    It was a very quick diagnosis -- just a hearing test. I guess I'm wondering if I should get a 2nd opinion or if it doesn't really matter.

    I will probably get a CT scan as he recommended. Has anyone else done that? If so, what does that involve, and did it show otosclerosis in your results? (He said it is only visible in about half of the cases.)

    Thanks. I'm new to the forum, and while I wish no one had hearing problems, it's comforting that I'm not alone in facing these issues.
    I don't think the second opinion is needed. If he suspects otosclerosis it's pretty easy to determine bases on the difference between air and bone conduction, and the CT scan is only being used to confirm the diagnosis or find another cause.
    Oticon Agil Pro w/streamer

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    L 10--5----10----30---50----70----85---80---80
    R 5--10----20----35---45----85----85--100--100

    SP Disc ------------- SRT
    L 88% @55db ------- L-10
    R 90% @55db------- R-25

  8. #8

    Default Yes.. There is a chance....but....

    Hi,

    I've performed thousands of hearing tests and otosclerosis is one of the easier diagnosis to make. Your post didn't have enough information to offer an opinion as to why the hearing professional referred you for medical testing. Doctors of Audiology, whether young or old, often refer for medical clearance not because they suspect there is something underlying, but because their governing body says they must. Both asymmetrical hearing loss and A/B gaps can trigger this forced referral. Hopefully that's all this is, but these policies are really in place because it's 'Better to be safe than Sorry'.

    Feel free to email me a copy of your audiogram if you would like me to review it and explain the results further (audiogram@clearlyhearing.com).

    As Otosclerosis progresses it shows up on an audiogram in a tel-tale pattern. A conductive hearing loss will present itself at 250Hz, 500Hz and 1000Hz. If you also present high frequency hearing loss it is likely contributed to something else, often natural aging, noise damage or something stemming from toxicity.

    Jeffrey David
    www.clearlyhearing.com




    Quote Originally Posted by jupebox View Post
    Is there ever a chance of misdiagnosis, or is this a pretty clear diagnosis?

    I definitely have some hearing issues in my left ear. I've lost about 30%. I visited a younger doctor, but I think he was a Stanford graduate.

    It was a very quick diagnosis -- just a hearing test. I guess I'm wondering if I should get a 2nd opinion or if it doesn't really matter.

    I will probably get a CT scan as he recommended. Has anyone else done that? If so, what does that involve, and did it show otosclerosis in your results? (He said it is only visible in about half of the cases.)

    Thanks. I'm new to the forum, and while I wish no one had hearing problems, it's comforting that I'm not alone in facing these issues.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    331

    Default

    [QUOTE=seb;119321]I don't think the second opinion is needed. If he suspects otosclerosis it's pretty easy to determine bases on the difference between air and bone conduction, and the CT scan is only being used to confirm the diagnosis or find another cause.[/QUOTE

    From my experience, it's not always that easy to confirm otosclerosis. I was originally thought to have otosclerosis due to a pretty flat-across-the-board hearing loss. The difference between bone and air conduction is at least 10 dB, and in some cases 20 dB for the lower and mid-frequencies, then the conductive loss lessens in the higher frequencies. Two audiologists, including one otologist, were convinced that a stapedectomy would "fix everything" in my right ear. But I was having some other issues, so sought the opinion of a third specialist, a neurotologist, who actually determined that I have an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (right ear only), which in some cases, has been shown to mimic otosclerosis in terms of audiological exams. Here's the link to the abstract of one article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24028978.
    Here's a link to a full article: http://www.jmedicalcasereports.com/content/6/1/178 These two articles tell me that diagnosing otosclerosis isn't always as clear cut as one would think.
    November, 2016

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    L
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    SRT: R-50, L-35
    WR: R-92% at 80 dB, L-100% at 75 dB

    Wearing Oticon Alta 2 Mini RITEs since July 8/15.

  10. #10

    Default

    Thank-you for the links KerBear, the information was educational.

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