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Thread: Using MP3 Player Earbuds with Hearing Aids??

  1. #1

    Default Using MP3 Player Earbuds with Hearing Aids??

    When I ride my bike or when I am at the pool I like to listen to my music via a MP3 player and headphones/earbuds. Right now I have to remove my hearing aid to do this. I usually have to reinstall my hearing aid if someone wants to talk to me. My current HA is about 8 years old. Will new HA's have capabilities to make this easier? This may be what "streaming" is that is discussed on this forum.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by reubenray View Post
    When I ride my bike or when I am at the pool I like to listen to my music via a MP3 player and headphones/earbuds. Right now I have to remove my hearing aid to do this. I usually have to reinstall my hearing aid if someone wants to talk to me. My current HA is about 8 years old. Will new HA's have capabilities to make this easier? This may be what "streaming" is that is discussed on this forum.
    Yes, you can stream music to a bluetooth device (like my Resound Phone Clip+) or in some cases directly from an iphone. The music would be stored on and played from your phone, tablet, laptop, or one version of the old ipod had bluetooth.

    One benefit of streaming to your hearing aids is that the sound is "tuned" specifically for your hearing loss.

    Research Phone Clip+, ComPilot II, ComPilot Air, Smart Connect, Com-DEX to get an idea of how they work.

    You can have your hearing aids microphones stay on during streaming, if you want, so if someone talks to you during streaming you might be able to hear it, or if you pause the music the microphones are on and they could repeat it.


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  3. #3
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    It depends on expectation. Aids are made to amplify speech rather than music. They do their best for streaming with full domes. With aids, streaming will duplicate something like a really decent, $30 clock radio. It won't duplicate a full-blown hifi system. We've audiophiles here that still prefer ear phones over their aids. Others have great success streaming while biking etc.
    Last edited by KenP; 06-24-2016 at 07:51 AM.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenP View Post
    It depends on expectation. Aids are made to amplify speech rather than music. They do their best for streaming with full domes. With aids, streaming will duplicate something like a really decent, $30 clock radio. It won't duplicate a full-blown hifi system. We've audiophiles here that still prefer ear phones over their aids. Others have great success streaming while biking etc.
    I stream music via Compilot to my Phonak hearing aids and I have been amazed by how good it sounded from day one. I am not an audiophile, but I have enjoyed music my whole life and continue to do so.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by seasonedears View Post
    I stream music via Compilot to my Phonak hearing aids and I have been amazed by how good it sounded from day one. I am not an audiophile, but I have enjoyed music my whole life and continue to do so.
    By using the word "stream" to me it means you will need wifi or 4G connections to do this. This also uses data.

    Is this correct?

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reubenray View Post
    By using the word "stream" to me it means you will need wifi or 4G connections to do this. This also uses data.

    Is this correct?
    Streaming uses a Bluetooth connection to your phone or other device. It's not Wi-Fi or cellular.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by reubenray View Post
    When I ride my bike or when I am at the pool I like to listen to my music via a MP3 player and headphones/earbuds. Right now I have to remove my hearing aid to do this. I usually have to reinstall my hearing aid if someone wants to talk to me. My current HA is about 8 years old. Will new HA's have capabilities to make this easier? This may be what "streaming" is that is discussed on this forum.
    An alternative to consider might be over-the-ear headphones. I listen to TV audio with a pair of circumaural headphones (completely surround the ear). I use a smaller pair of supra-aural (pads that sit on top of the ear) headphones for my iPod. Both kinds work fine with my HAs (RIC type) in.
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    The Starkey Halo 2 hearing aids stream directly from the iPhone to the hearing aids. Quality is a mixed bag. For podcasts, audiobooks, talk radio, NPR, phone calls, and things like that, they're incredible! Voices come in crystal clear. They're some of the smallest, stealthiest "headphones" you can buy—of any type. For music and movies, they're one big "meh." There's no just bass. I'd compare it to the sound system on a bus. And that's with the "music" program. I wear 8mm open domes. That probably has something to do with it. I doubt any open-fit hearing aid could possibly match the sound quality of dedicated headphones.

    Convenience wise, you can pause the audio on the iPhone lock screen and hear someone pretty quickly.
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  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icanseeyourhalo View Post
    The Starkey Halo 2 hearing aids stream directly from the iPhone to the hearing aids. Quality is a mixed bag. For podcasts, audiobooks, talk radio, NPR, phone calls, and things like that, they're incredible! Voices come in crystal clear. They're some of the smallest, stealthiest "headphones" you can buy—of any type. For music and movies, they're one big "meh." There's no just bass. I'd compare it to the sound system on a bus. And that's with the "music" program. I wear 8mm open domes. That probably has something to do with it. I doubt any open-fit hearing aid could possibly match the sound quality of dedicated headphones.

    Convenience wise, you can pause the audio on the iPhone lock screen and hear someone pretty quickly.
    I would suggest trying the closed (occluded) domes for better sound quality. With open domes, you're essentially getting no gain below 1000 Hz.

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobwal View Post
    An alternative to consider might be over-the-ear headphones. I listen to TV audio with a pair of circumaural headphones (completely surround the ear). I use a smaller pair of supra-aural (pads that sit on top of the ear) headphones for my iPod. Both kinds work fine with my HAs (RIC type) in.
    Quote Originally Posted by icanseeyourhalo View Post
    Quality is a mixed bag. For podcasts, audiobooks, talk radio, NPR, phone calls, and things like that, they're incredible! Voices come in crystal clear. They're some of the smallest, stealthiest "headphones" you can buy—of any type. For music and movies, they're one big "meh." There's no just bass. I'd compare it to the sound system on a bus. And that's with the "music" program.
    At work, we're not supposed to be listening to "personal devices." It's more about appearances than anything else. We work in a cleanroom, and I don't think customers would be too impressed if we had wires hanging out from under our hoods. Anyways, like Icanseeyourhalo said, the hearing aids are neat little stealth headphones. I can listen to music while I'm working, although it's not very hi-fidelity. Good enough for what I'm doing at the moment, and nobody knows what I'm up to (as long as I can resist dancing.)

    At home, I often listen to music to try to transcribe what they're playing. That's where Bobwal's idea comes in. Bose headphones over my aids deliver the kind of sound I need for that.
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