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Thread: Opn Bluetooh and Android

  1. #11

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    Yes, it would be interesting to see the patents (and they must be public). And yes, what Apple's done will all be in software; Android and iOS use the same BTLE standard. My guess is that Apple created a proprietary Bluetooth "profile" for this; they have also modified the standard BT software to circumvent a pairing key, automatically stream to the HA's, forward audio from the mic, etc.
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  2. #12

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    The article linked below explains a lot. The main point is bluetooth low energy (BLE), even when direct streaming to an iPhone (using their BLE/MFi audio protocol), has fairly poor audio (though we might not notice). But it is very convenient . Anyway, it sounds like current BLE tech is limited by the compromises of power use, range, and audio quality. I can see possibilities for OPN to directly stream to some Android devices in time - the main issue with Android is lack of consistency in the devices, both hardware and software. Eventually the latest/greatest Android devices should have something equivalent to BLE/MFi built in, and these likely will be able stream directly to HA devices. **All** (recent) iPhones already have exactly the same BLE/MFi capabilities, which makes the HA manufactures job **much** easier. And even if Apple's BLE/MFi audio streaming protocol is patented in some manner, it's obvious devices like OPN have the other side of this built in via a chip that Apple does not make. I find it doubtful that this chip manufacturer and all the HA companies would allow Apple to lock them into something so exclusive. For one, it's more likely that Apple agreed to support the chip manufacturer's protocol (as the article below notes, almost all HA use more or less the same BLE chip). IOW the chip manufacturer likely owns a big part of this protocol. For another, the EU would not be so happy if Apple attempted to own or monopolize such an important feature of hearing aids, which are almost all made in Europe. So Apple suing to prevent Oticon or Resound from supporting audio streaming to Android or other non-Apple devices seems like a fight not worth fighting even if they could fight. Especially when Apple and the EU are already in a pretty big fight worth way more $$.

    My thought is to get the Oticon OPN which works best for me, and if I really need some sort of direct audio streaming, buy a used iPod off ebay and wait until Android devices catch up / get supported if ever. Or perhaps the next Oticon streamer model will be much improved so I don't mind using it (I haven't actually tried the current around the neck streamer, but it does look a bit clunky).

    https://mimi.io/blog/can-bluetooth-d...aring-devices/

  3. #13
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    I thought that the article was a clearer explanation of what MFi is actually doing and what it is all about for the future. It has some interesting links to click on.

    BLE (Smart) is only used to communicate a narrow data stream between aids and devices. (App controls)

    Bluetooth is transmitted as with other BT devices. The aid then acts as a radio (receive only) device using the same chip.

    That explains the need for a true BT device if you want to transmit your voice separate from the phone mic.

    Looks like the next step, utilizing bi-directional sound between the device and aids, is a year or two away.
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  4. Default

    Is there a working link for the clearer explanation between MFi and Ble? The link seems to be dead.

  5. #15
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    Go to Wikipedia and search Bluetooth.
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  6. #16

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    Gee.. Would someone do my homework for me..

  7. #17
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    Gee Jakey, I don't think any of us do potholders. Keep up the therapy though.
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  8. #18

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    Kenji you off the wagon again?

  9. #19

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    I purchased my Oticon bluetooth last fall, had it paired to my Alta2 and my LG phone. I also wear wireless headphones to hear the television (not using the bluetooth); and if the phone rings, the interruption is obvious to the bluetooth, cutting out the television signal automatically. I presume that is the desired action. I may be in a different room than my phone and it has no lessened signal. I don't listen to music on my phone, however.

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