Page 10 of 18 FirstFirst ... 89101112 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 176

Thread: New Hearing assist devices better than hearing aids

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    670

    Default

    I'm new at this, but I think it's really hard (impossible?) for hearing aids to reduce noise in frequencies that one has near normal hearing. Your 500hz to 2000hz (speech frequencies is near normal on the right and with the exception of 2000hz is identical on the left) I would think using the narrow directional capabilities of your hearing aids might help. How well are other people hearing in the situation. Sometimes you'll be surprised if you ask and others will say they couldn't hear either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grey Wolf View Post
    I appreciate you were directing the above to the OP however as I have the same issue I am wondering if you think my problems in noise are also due to my level of hearing loss - brain struggling to adapt? I have been wearing HAs approximately 8 hours a day for 18 months (currently the Rexton Trax 42) but only find them a benefit in quiet environments - and only a little benefit at that! I can hear better in pubs, social gatherings etc. without my aids but not nearly well enough to play an active part in group conversations. That is the reason I am very interested in the new hearing assist devices and the reason I follow this thread. There are people contributing here with obviously much greater knowledge of this than myself and they are saying that if hearing aids are adjusted correctly then all should be well - maybe not in so many words but that's how I interpret it. However, my experience with several audiologists has not born this out - I have been for numerous adjustments without any noticeable improvements. Now, based on the advice received here I have insisted on an appointment with the rep. This is taking place next week but I wonder if I could be wasting my time? From what you are suggesting I need to wait for my brain to acclimatise?
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MDB View Post
    I'm new at this, but I think it's really hard (impossible?) for hearing aids to reduce noise in frequencies that one has near normal hearing. Your 500hz to 2000hz (speech frequencies is near normal on the right and with the exception of 2000hz is identical on the left) I would think using the narrow directional capabilities of your hearing aids might help. How well are other people hearing in the situation. Sometimes you'll be surprised if you ask and others will say they couldn't hear either.
    Thanks MDB but at the last noisy place I was at - a wedding reception - I tried narrowing the direction to a very narrow focus on the person speaking to me but I still couldn't pick out all his words. The general noise from other conversations in the room/table, plates rattling etc seemed to block the speech. My wife, sitting next to me had to repeat his words to me (shout in my ear!) and I wouldn't say she has super hearing.

    I seem to be getting two conflicting possible reasons for my issue - one, like yours and my audiologist which is mainly "it is the best it can get" / "your expectations are too high" - and others saying that properly adjusted hearing aids should allow you to hear in noise.

    Which is it? I have that appointment with the Rexton rep coming up - this will probably be my last attempt with my current hearing aids and then I will seriously consider giving the IQbuds from Nuheara a try - despite the general consensus of opinion on this thread.
    My Audiogram
    0250Hz R-50 L-45
    0500Hz R-20 L-15
    1000Hz R-10 L-20
    2000Hz R-20 L-30
    4000Hz R-50 L-60
    8000Hz R-70 L-75

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JustEd View Post
    "My hearing low to mid range was 100% , so my hearing aids are open fit and just try to add the higher frequencies that challenge me."

    Just wondering how you will expect a one size fits all approach to this type of hearing when it appears that you only need help in the higher areas.

    which lies my concern in most OTC hearing solutions


    The answer is quite simple.

    At least four or five different hearing professionals have been unable to help me hear in noise.
    I wear 4 year old aids that were the best available at the time and they did not work.
    My current practitioner advises me that newer aids will offer only a marginal improvement.
    The practitioner offered an fm system with a microphone that I could pass around the table so people could speak to me…….



    this is what he said in 2014…..

    [I]What you are describing is not uncommon with very high noise levels.

    FM systems are the only way to effectively cope with these levels of
    noise and if you can get past the hassle factor of having to charge it
    and pass the microphone around, they work very well.

    Your only option with your aids would be to use a Compilot with FM
    shoe and then a microphone. Phonak's Roger is the latest technology in
    this arena.

    The ComPilot costs $275 and then you need an FM shoe receiver to plug
    into it, which costs $650 as well as the Roger Pen Fm Transmitter
    which retails for $1000.

    So all up it would cost just under $2000 for the entire set-up.

    We would need to create Fm programs in your aids and pair the Compilot
    to them as well. We can do this in about 30 minutes.[/I]



    I ask every professional reading this :… WHY WOULD I NOT SEEK TO HEAR

  4. #94

    Default

    Without a current audiogram everyone is just guessing..

  5. Default

    I am a little puzzled by the reliance and audiometric measurements as it seems a very blunt tool… anyway…

    Best guess extrapolation from a 2013 graph follows :

    R L
    250 hz 20 20
    500Hz 10 15
    1000hz 10 20
    1500hz 20 20
    2000hz 55 60
    3000hz 65 65
    4000hz 70 80
    8000hz 75 80


    Does this information provide some kind of seminal illumination to the multitudes… :-)

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,640
    Blog Entries
    13

    Default

    FM tech is a bit antiquated and quite pricey. Most aids offer a remote mic for far less. If you are thinking about it still, I would check ebay.
    Hidden Content
    KS6's w. Phone Clip +

    Visit my blog here for post that I think valuable -- especially new members.

    There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. -- William Shakespeare





  7. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    3,578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tgh View Post
    I am a little puzzled by the reliance and audiometric measurements as it seems a very blunt tool… anyway…

    Best guess extrapolation from a 2013 graph follows :

    R L
    250 hz 20 20
    500Hz 10 15
    1000hz 10 20
    1500hz 20 20
    2000hz 55 60
    3000hz 65 65
    4000hz 70 80
    8000hz 75 80


    Does this information provide some kind of seminal illumination to the multitudes… :-)
    We get our volume from the LF and our clarity from our HF; since your HF loss is in the 55 to 80 dB range and you have open fit HA's it's no wonder you can't hear in noise. My HF loss is worse than yours in most of the HF's, but I have earmolds and I went to a HIS who not only was well respected, but knew what she was doing in programming my HA's for use in a noisy situation. Yours on the other hand seems to be just "well respected" and didn't know what to do to get you hearing in challenging situations. The difference is: I hear quite well in noisy situations whereas you don't and your searching for ways to get to where I am at with alternate means.
    Oticon Agil Pro w/streamer

    -250 500 1000 1500 2000 3000 4000 6000 8000
    L 10--5----10----30---50----70----85---80---80
    R 5--10----20----35---45----85----85--100--100

    SP Disc ------------- SRT
    L 88% @55db ------- L-10
    R 90% @55db------- R-25

  8. #98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tgh View Post
    I am a little puzzled by the reliance and audiometric measurements as it seems a very blunt tool… anyway…

    Best guess extrapolation from a 2013 graph follows :

    R L
    250 hz 20 20
    500Hz 10 15
    1000hz 10 20
    1500hz 20 20
    2000hz 55 60
    3000hz 65 65
    4000hz 70 80
    8000hz 75 80


    Does this information provide some kind of seminal illumination to the multitudes… :-)
    Yes, this information is very crucial to understand what kind of hearing loss you have, in order to have more intelligent discussion that's more directed and applicable to YOUR hearing loss.

    Seb is right that if you wear an open fit dome or CIC with a large vent hole, it'll let in the lows and mids naturally and provides boost in the high frequency range only. The HF boost provides the clarity and in noisy situation, the loud volume in the low and mid that come through the vent in your HA may drown out the HF boost from your HA, therefore causing the HF clarity to be lost in the midst of the loud low and mid sounds, which directional beam forming will not help in your case because the loud lows and mids still come through unblocked anyway.

    If you find the over the counter device more effective for you, that's most likely just because they're earbud types or completely enclosed type devices that block out the loud natural lows and mids from coming in and allow you to focus more on the beam formed sound in the front. The HAs can just be as effective (if not even more so) if you just switch over to a more occluded type of fitting to control the volume level of the lows and mids better in noisy situations. Surely it's a trade off having to put up with more occlusion in order to hear better in noisy situations, but if you're willing to put up with wearing over the counter devices in noisy situations anyway, it means that you're already willing to live with some kind of trade-off. You don't have to go with 100% occlusion, though. Maybe a small vent hole or two maybe a good compromise to relieve some of the occlusion but still provide better sound isolation. My left hearing is fairly normal until 1.5KHz and I wear a bass dome with a single vent hole and I still don't feel very occluded, so it's a great compromise for me.

    I'm not sure why your providers didn't suggest this option first (change from an open fit to something more enclosed) instead of pushing you to expensive and antiquated FM Roger pen type solutions. I understand that most people with your type of hearing loss still do OK in noisy situations with an open fit, but not everybody is the same. So if you don't do well with open fit in noisy situations, they shouldn't assume that you're the same as most people and should have tried a different fitting arrangement for you instead of telling you that there's nothing more they can do for you.

    Hopefully you can see now how useful an audiogram can be if posted.
    Last edited by Volusiano; 03-14-2017 at 03:03 PM.
    HA wearer since the 1990's > Rexton Insite+ CIC (2011-2016) > Oticon OPN RITE (2016)

    KHz 0.25...0.5...0.75...1.0...1.5...2.0...3.0...4.0... 6.0...8.0

    Left ...10...10....10.....30.....70....75....80....95.. ..90....80
    Right .25...30....40.....55.....75....85....90....90...1 00...100

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    670

    Default

    I'm definitely new at this and agree that an audiogram is important, but I believe there are other variables that can be involved. Somebody (Neville maybe?) spoke to the importance of Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and that people with identical audiograms can require markedly different SNRs to be able to understand speech.

    Quote Originally Posted by Volusiano View Post
    Yes, this information is very crucial to understand what kind of hearing loss you have, in order to have more intelligent discussion that's more directed and applicable to YOUR hearing loss.

    Seb is right that if you wear an open fit dome or CIC with a large vent hole, it'll let in the lows and mids naturally and provides boost in the high frequency range only. The HF boost provides the clarity and in noisy situation, the loud volume in the low and mid that come through the vent in your HA may drown out the HF boost from your HA, therefore causing the HF clarity to be lost in the midst of the loud low and mid sounds, which directional beam forming will not help in your case because the loud lows and mids still come through unblocked anyway.

    If you find the over the counter device more effective for you, that's most likely just because they're earbud types or completely enclosed type devices that block out the loud natural lows and mids from coming in and allow you to focus more on the beam formed sound in the front. The HAs can just be as effective (if not even more) if you just switch over to a more occluded type of fitting to control the volume level of the lows and mids better in noisy situations. Surely it's a trade off having to put up with more occlusion in order to hear better in noisy situations, but if you're willing to put up with wearing over the counter devices in noisy situations anyway, it means that you're already willing to live with some kind of trade-off. You don't have to go with 100% occlusion, though. Maybe a small vent hole or two maybe a good compromise to relieve some of the occlusion but still provide better sound isolation. My left hearing is fairly normal until 1.5KHz and I wear a bass dome with a single vent hole and I still don't feel very occluded, so it's a great compromise for me.

    I'm not sure why your providers didn't suggest this option first (change from an open fit to something more enclosed) instead of pushing you to expensive and antiquated FM Roger pen type solutions. I understand that most people with your type of hearing loss still do OK in noisy situations with an open fit, but not everybody is the same. So if you don't do well with open fit in noisy situations, they shouldn't assume that you're the same as most people and should have tried a different fitting arrangement for you instead of telling you that there's nothing more they can do for you.

    Hopefully you can see now how useful an audiogram can be if posted.
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  10. #100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MDB View Post
    I'm definitely new at this and agree that an audiogram is important, but I believe there are other variables that can be involved. Somebody (Neville maybe?) spoke to the importance of Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and that people with identical audiograms can require markedly different SNRs to be able to understand speech.
    Yes, I agree that you shouldn't assume that people with the same type of audiogram should benefit from the same type of fitting or programming. That should just be a starting point and the service provider should have adjusted from there based on the individuality of each case. Obviously that's the case here with TGH where many people with his hearing loss profile can cope with noisy situation OK in an open fit but he can't for some reason. I just wonder if his service provider considered trying a fitting change for him before concluding that the only option left for him is a directed mic approach.
    HA wearer since the 1990's > Rexton Insite+ CIC (2011-2016) > Oticon OPN RITE (2016)

    KHz 0.25...0.5...0.75...1.0...1.5...2.0...3.0...4.0... 6.0...8.0

    Left ...10...10....10.....30.....70....75....80....95.. ..90....80
    Right .25...30....40.....55.....75....85....90....90...1 00...100

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •