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Thread: Hearing aid styles

  1. #1

    Default Hearing aid styles

    I have bilateral hearing loss, much worse in the right ear due to a large perforation in the ear drum. I have an active life style and would like to get a hearing aid that (1) provides me with the best hearing in difficult listening environments and with the least feedback and (2) can have adequate ventilation to minimize the risk of middle ear infection due to perforation. What style (RIC, ITE, etc.) hearing aid would be best for me and what are the pro and cons of different styles? I would appreciate comments from experts. This is my audiogram:

    KHz 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000
    Right 60 60 65 75 80 95
    Left 30 30 50 55 70 90

    jm40
    Last edited by jm40; 03-08-2017 at 01:23 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    If I were in your shoes. I would beat feet (forgive the pun) to a experienced audiologist.
    KH.....(.25)....(.50)....(1.0)....(2.0)....(3.0).. ..(4.0)....(6.0)....(8.0)
    Left......8..........0........10....... 10.......45........60........50.......65
    Right....8..........0........10........10.......40 .......50........45.......50

    Signia Pure Primax 5PX 03/2017





  3. Default

    Have you seen an ENT doctor about closing the perforation using certain surgical techniques? Your hearing may be improved as a result.

  4. #4

    Default Hearing aid styles

    Quote Originally Posted by rasmus_braun View Post
    Have you seen an ENT doctor about closing the perforation using certain surgical techniques? Your hearing may be improved as a result.

    I lost about 25 dB in low frequencies as a consequence of perforation, which is large. I saw two otologists who told me that I could regain no more than 12-13 dB with tympanoplasty. Since I would have to wear hearing aids anyway, they me were not for surgery.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jm40 View Post
    I have bilateral hearing loss, much worse in the right ear due to a large perforation in the ear drum. I have an active life style and would like to get a hearing aid that (1) provides me with the best hearing in difficult listening environments and with the least feedback and (2) can have adequate ventilation to minimize the risk of middle ear infection due to perforation. What style (RIC, ITE, etc.) hearing aid would be best for me and what are the pro and cons of different styles? I would appreciate comments from experts. This is my audiogram:

    KHz 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000
    Right 60 60 65 75 80 95
    Left 30 30 50 55 70 90

    jm40
    I know a HIS who has two perforated ear drums and has had several procedures to close them up without success. She wears CIC HA's feeling they offer her the best protection against ear infections. She has also worn BTE's with full molds in the past as well, but prefers the CIC's. With your 60dB loss in the low frequencies in your right ear you need a occluded mold anyway and a CIC will give it to you. The left ear you don't really need an occluded mold.
    Oticon Agil Pro w/streamer

    -250 500 1000 1500 2000 3000 4000 6000 8000
    L 10--5----10----30---50----70----85---80---80
    R 5--10----20----35---45----85----85--100--100

    SP Disc ------------- SRT
    L 88% @55db ------- L-10
    R 90% @55db------- R-25

  6. #6

    Default Hearing aid styles

    Quote Originally Posted by seb View Post
    I know a HIS who has two perforated ear drums and has had several procedures to close them up without success. She wears CIC HA's feeling they offer her the best protection against ear infections. She has also worn BTE's with full molds in the past as well, but prefers the CIC's. With your 60dB loss in the low frequencies in your right ear you need a occluded mold anyway and a CIC will give it to you. The left ear you don't really need an occluded mold.

    From what I have read, occluded molds in the presence of ear drum perforation are associated with a high risk of middle ear infection due to moisture and ear ventilation, achieved by venting or periods of non-use, would minimize this problem. Is this true?

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