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Thread: Music via DSP in Car instead of HA

  1. Default Music via DSP in Car instead of HA

    Slightly off topic...

    I'm putting a (many band) Digital Signal Processor in my car audio.

    I know I'll need to kick up the high frequencies to make up for my HF loss.
    [I have some loss but not enough that I have HA's yet, normal until about 2K then taper ~50db @8k]

    When adjusting the DSP, it talks about adjustments in single digit db's, but the loss's we talk about here are 20-60 db.

    So it doesn't seem reasonable to bump up my DSP by 30db. Feels like the units are somehow different.

    I know I can just 'tune' by ear, but since I have a loss graph, it seems like a using that would be a good place to start.

    Anyone have advice on using their hearing chart to adjust an audio DSP for music?

    Thanks much for the help. I know it's not HA related, but this seems like the right audience for the question.

  2. #2
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    Since I assume you're listening for pleasure, I think ultimately you do want to tune by ear. A quick and dirty rule that is sometimes used for hearing aids is to increase gain by 1/3. So for the 50db loss, maybe 16 or 17db. I'm guessing that will sound really sharp. You could also use the audiogram just to guide you--more gain at this frequency than that one. But again ultimately, go with what sounds good to you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Rat View Post
    Slightly off topic...

    I'm putting a (many band) Digital Signal Processor in my car audio.

    I know I'll need to kick up the high frequencies to make up for my HF loss.
    [I have some loss but not enough that I have HA's yet, normal until about 2K then taper ~50db @8k]

    When adjusting the DSP, it talks about adjustments in single digit db's, but the loss's we talk about here are 20-60 db.

    So it doesn't seem reasonable to bump up my DSP by 30db. Feels like the units are somehow different.

    I know I can just 'tune' by ear, but since I have a loss graph, it seems like a using that would be a good place to start.

    Anyone have advice on using their hearing chart to adjust an audio DSP for music?

    Thanks much for the help. I know it's not HA related, but this seems like the right audience for the question.
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  3. Default

    I use my computer for enjoying music. I output to either speakers through an amp or to headphones. I found a program that can adjust EQ separately on left and right rather than just global. This is particularly useful when using headphones.
    MDB is right. I found out by trial and error that about half of the audiogram seemed to sound about right. I adjusted the EQ at each audiogram frequency on left and right to about half and then sloped the in-betweens to bridge and make a nicer curve.
    btw...the KS7 music program out of the box did seem to sound pretty decent with a flat EQ for the source.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by z10user2 View Post
    I found a program that can adjust EQ separately on left and right rather than just global.
    I'd be interested to know which program this is?
    250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k
    Left 25 20 15 25 65 95
    Right 20 25 30 35 50 50

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patgreen View Post
    I'd be interested to know which program this is?
    Equalizer APO. I'm using W10.
    It's a bit fiddly. It's a bit technical. It has a couple quirks. But once you figure it out and set it...it's set and forget. Thereafter, all sounds go through it. You can change settings on the fly using a saved settings file as well.
    Last edited by z10user2; 05-29-2017 at 10:19 AM.

  6. #6

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    Consider that, depending on the music that you are listening to, the artist may have written it with a similar hearing loss to yours.

  7. #7
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    Hah! Good point. Music for the hard of hearing. :>)

    Quote Originally Posted by Neville View Post
    Consider that, depending on the music that you are listening to, the artist may have written it with a similar hearing loss to yours.
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  8. Default

    Hah! WITH REALLY LOUD CYMBALS!!!
    What!? Sounds completely normal to me.
    Last edited by z10user2; 05-30-2017 at 05:52 PM.

  9. Default

    I use a Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge with an aux cable and the special "Adapt Sound" setting on the phone. This allows me to trick the Samsung into allowing me to use it's audio test app to tune the audio specifically for my needs with my car stereo. https://gs7.gadgethacks.com/how-to/u...alaxy-0172070/ Note this same article was also in another thread, but I've been using this to great success. Of course the listening experience is not as good for my passengers...
    Last edited by SeaRefractor; 05-30-2017 at 09:19 PM.
    Hearing aids: Kirkland Signature™ 7.0 Premium P-Receiver

  10. Default

    SeaRefractor: Nice feature. Did it even pretty much match your audiogram?
    I didn't pick up on the other thread because I don't have a Samsung. Thanks for pointing it out here.
    Last edited by z10user2; 05-30-2017 at 10:04 PM.

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