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Thread: OPN 1 vs. Linx2 9 for Music, concerts, Ménière's

  1. Default OPN 1 vs. Linx2 9 for Music, concerts, Ménière's

    I have suffered with hearing loss since I was 6 years old due to constant severe ear infections, and finally diagnosed with Ménière's disease when I was 21. I also have tinnitus and frequent migraines, which is particularly inconvenient when my vertigo flares up.

    I got my first hearing aids at that time, over 12 years ago. They still look brand new! I have taken extremely good care of them, combined with many times not wearing them due to my Ménière's symptoms being mild during those times. I still have them, a set of Phonak MiniValeo. They are starting to make a somewhat crackling sound.

    I am an audiophile and musician at home only, with moderate high-end loss and I have lots of difficulty with hearing and deciphering speech, even a one on one situation. I am also a tech junkie, so the IFTTT features of the OPN1 are very appealing to me.

    I am between the Resound Linx2 9's and the OPN 1.

    My concern with the OPN 1 is their brain hearing philosophy. I have ADHD and paying attention to a specific speaker is already hard for me, adding in my difficulty hearing speech, I am concerned this may become a problem unless I don't really understand how this function works.

    They both have similar specs, except the OPN1 has more programming and adjustability it seems. They are both Made for iPhone, have the Find my Hearing Aid function, are both easily programmed DIY, and have 2.4ghz direct streaming.

    The functions I would miss if I bought the Resound is:
    IFTTT integration with my smarthome devices
    IP rating
    It only has 9 adjustment bands vs. the OPN1's 16 bands
    The OPN has 64 processing channels, more than anything else I can find

    Both will do the following:
    Made for iPhone
    2.4ghz streaming
    Binaural communication
    Tinnitus relief
    Find my HA function
    DIY programmable
    RIC is upgradeable in the future if I need it
    I can experiment with different fittings
    I also think both work for live music concerts at 113db

    The Resound has the traditional noise blocking of what I'm used to. They're also a year older which means they're less expensive, but also means less technology.

    To those who have OPN, how does the Brain Hearing actually work? Did it take getting used to? Which HA has the best sound quality for loud concerts, and which has the best for listening to music via iPhone or in the car?

    RIC is new to me, as my current aids are open fittings (which was kind of a new thing when I bought them.) I know that will only improve sound quality. I am prepared to have specific programs for music listening only so streaming will deliver all ranges of sound, simply compensating for my loss where I need it. Both aids cover my loss as I'm at the mild-moderate stage and have been for a long time. I would get the 2nd step up receiver for both, but both aids offer a lot more receivers if my hearing worsens.

    I like to buy it right, buy it once, and have no interest in upgrading these for at least 7 years given my track record in keeping and caring for HA's unless cost comes way down or technology advances significantly.

    Thanks in advance for your input,
    Brittany

  2. #2

    Default

    Rasmus_braun posted this link previously. Brain hearing is not based on scientific research. Just good marketing.

    https://www.stonearchcreative.com/oticon/

    They are both premium aids. I wear Oticon OPN1 and they are good and natural. Not great IMO for handling very noisy situations. Resound has more accessories. For ADHD, I'd think using a clip on on mic might be beneficial to stay focused so Resound might be a good choice. You can compare their features on hearingtracker.com. Good luck!
    Last edited by Abarsanti; 08-04-2017 at 03:35 AM.
    Tony
    ---------------------
    Oticon OPNs
    Previously: Bernafon Juna 9s with Soundgate 3
    ----------------------
    55 55 50 10 60 25
    250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000
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    Word Recognition, 60% at 70 db (left), 96% at 65db (right)
    <Tested 1/2/17>

  3. #3
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    The Lynx2 9 is previous generation - unless it's the 3D model.
    'He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life.'
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Central California
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    Default

    I'm not sure how useful comments from us will be in making a decision. To really know, you're going to have to try them out. A couple of comments. 1) Why the Linx 2s instead of the newer Linx 3Ds? At least from Buyhear, they seem to be same price. 2) I'm unclear if the Linxs have the same 113db dynamic ranges as the Opns. I kind of doubt it, but just don't know. 3) The Linxs with their Multimic would be a pretty neat setup in noisy situations.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brittany View Post
    I have suffered with hearing loss since I was 6 years old due to constant severe ear infections, and finally diagnosed with Ménière's disease when I was 21. I also have tinnitus and frequent migraines, which is particularly inconvenient when my vertigo flares up.

    I got my first hearing aids at that time, over 12 years ago. They still look brand new! I have taken extremely good care of them, combined with many times not wearing them due to my Ménière's symptoms being mild during those times. I still have them, a set of Phonak MiniValeo. They are starting to make a somewhat crackling sound.

    I am an audiophile and musician at home only, with moderate high-end loss and I have lots of difficulty with hearing and deciphering speech, even a one on one situation. I am also a tech junkie, so the IFTTT features of the OPN1 are very appealing to me.

    I am between the Resound Linx2 9's and the OPN 1.

    My concern with the OPN 1 is their brain hearing philosophy. I have ADHD and paying attention to a specific speaker is already hard for me, adding in my difficulty hearing speech, I am concerned this may become a problem unless I don't really understand how this function works.

    They both have similar specs, except the OPN1 has more programming and adjustability it seems. They are both Made for iPhone, have the Find my Hearing Aid function, are both easily programmed DIY, and have 2.4ghz direct streaming.

    The functions I would miss if I bought the Resound is:
    IFTTT integration with my smarthome devices
    IP rating
    It only has 9 adjustment bands vs. the OPN1's 16 bands
    The OPN has 64 processing channels, more than anything else I can find

    Both will do the following:
    Made for iPhone
    2.4ghz streaming
    Binaural communication
    Tinnitus relief
    Find my HA function
    DIY programmable
    RIC is upgradeable in the future if I need it
    I can experiment with different fittings
    I also think both work for live music concerts at 113db

    The Resound has the traditional noise blocking of what I'm used to. They're also a year older which means they're less expensive, but also means less technology.

    To those who have OPN, how does the Brain Hearing actually work? Did it take getting used to? Which HA has the best sound quality for loud concerts, and which has the best for listening to music via iPhone or in the car?

    RIC is new to me, as my current aids are open fittings (which was kind of a new thing when I bought them.) I know that will only improve sound quality. I am prepared to have specific programs for music listening only so streaming will deliver all ranges of sound, simply compensating for my loss where I need it. Both aids cover my loss as I'm at the mild-moderate stage and have been for a long time. I would get the 2nd step up receiver for both, but both aids offer a lot more receivers if my hearing worsens.

    I like to buy it right, buy it once, and have no interest in upgrading these for at least 7 years given my track record in keeping and caring for HA's unless cost comes way down or technology advances significantly.

    Thanks in advance for your input,
    Brittany
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  5. Default

    Ah, yes, I forgot to mention noisy situations. The Resound mic is a plus as Oticon seems to have majorly dropped the ball on their accessories.

    For those who have tried both, which has better overall sound quality?

  6. Default

    I like my Linx 3Ds. Most music is not a problem. I am still tweaking things however for solo piano playing. Changing the domes helped. The "Music" stock program is not really that useful to me. I put in another "All Around" and changed the time constant to long and cranked the DFS setting up. I'm still tweaking it, but right now my piano is covered in plastic due to some construction in the adjacent room.
    250 500 1K 2K 3K 4K 6K 8K
    R 15 25 30 40 50 55 60 65
    L 10 25 15 20 30 40 45 35





    Resound Linx 3D 9 (June 2017)
    Airllink2 Programmer/Smart Fit Software
    Multimic
    Phoneclip+
    TV Streamer 2
    iPhone 6

  7. #7

    Default

    In my opinion, brain hearing is not a marketing gimmick, it's just a simple fact of life. Everyone has brain hearing. It's nothing exclusive to the Oticon OPN either. Anybody who wears any other brand/model hearing aids use their brain hearing just the same as people who wear the Oticon OPN. Normal people use their brain hearing for listening, too. The only reason Oticon brings up brain hearing in the OPN marketing is to justify their open paradigm where they decide not to block out noise in the traditional directional beam forming way anymore. They're saying that the brain hearing can do that noise blocking instead. But this is just a generalization and how well hearing challenged people can utilize their brain hearing is very subjective and dependent a lot of the individual and their hearing loss. The only way to know if you can be successful with the OPN or not is to try it out and see.

    If you have ADHD, and are considering either the OPN or the Linx, I would suggest trying out the Linx 3D first (I agree with other posters, why the Linx2 when the 3D is available now?). If you're happy with it then you can just stick with the Linx. If you're not happy with the Linx then try out the OPN next. Or if you're curious, you can try out both. But I think with ADHD, maybe you'll have better luck with the Linx 3D than with the OPN.
    HA wearer since the 1990's > Rexton Insite+ CIC (2011-2016) > Oticon OPN RITE (2016)

    KHz 0.25...0.5...0.75...1.0...1.5...2.0...3.0...4.0... 6.0...8.0

    Left ...10...10....10.....30.....70....75....80....95.. ..90....80
    Right .25...30....40.....55.....75....85....90....90...1 00...100

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Location
    Central California
    Posts
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    I'm inclined to agree with Volusiano although I haven't used either aid. The Linx 3 should be a notable upgrade from what you've got and cheaper than the Oticon. It's also got the plus of having a really good remote microphone being available. Presumably you would have some time to trial and if you're not happy, then you can try the Oticon (and/or perhaps some other aides)

    Quote Originally Posted by Volusiano View Post
    In my opinion, brain hearing is not a marketing gimmick, it's just a simple fact of life. Everyone has brain hearing. It's nothing exclusive to the Oticon OPN either. Anybody who wears any other brand/model hearing aids use their brain hearing just the same as people who wear the Oticon OPN. Normal people use their brain hearing for listening, too. The only reason Oticon brings up brain hearing in the OPN marketing is to justify their open paradigm where they decide not to block out noise in the traditional directional beam forming way anymore. They're saying that the brain hearing can do that noise blocking instead. But this is just a generalization and how well hearing challenged people can utilize their brain hearing is very subjective and dependent a lot of the individual and their hearing loss. The only way to know if you can be successful with the OPN or not is to try it out and see.

    If you have ADHD, and are considering either the OPN or the Linx, I would suggest trying out the Linx 3D first (I agree with other posters, why the Linx2 when the 3D is available now?). If you're happy with it then you can just stick with the Linx. If you're not happy with the Linx then try out the OPN next. Or if you're curious, you can try out both. But I think with ADHD, maybe you'll have better luck with the Linx 3D than with the OPN.
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

  9. Default

    Thanks for all the helpful input. I am a DIYer and buying used aids, which is why I was looking at the Linx2 as the 3D simply isn't selling a lot on the secondary market.

    I have decided the IFTTT capabilities truly are that important to me, as I cannot hear the doorbell in the area of the house where I spend 100% of my time, and being able to set up more functions will be a great feature (although it seems many people don't have this integration for themselves, for me it will be a game changer.) My security system can alert me to motion outside, someone pulling in the drive, package deliveries, text messages from my daughter, emails from specific people, etc.

    The other thing is the difference in programming, with the Oticon offering more channels and adjustability.

    I know buying used isn't the most popular option, but I suffered a spinal injury and I've been bedridden for almost five years. With a dozen hospital stays, 8 surgeries, and over 40 procedures, my medical bills are insane and I just can't afford hearing aids even at a bargain price of $4000. Used, I could buy two sets of premium, current aids for that price. Programming them is the least of my concerns, they are relatively straightforward and with the community here I have help if I run into any issues. I already have a Mini Pro so I can pretty much program any aids except those without software or that are locked out (like Costco aids.)

    Even if I hate them, I can easily get my money back out of them and buy something else for that price. The other major issue for me is I can't "just" drive to the audiologist. I leave my house one time a month, going multiple times to the audiologist just won't happen. Being able to program them myself is a must with my health situation, which also means I don't have to figure out how to describe what I'm experiencing or hearing, I can just fix it!

    They should be here in a few days and I'll be able to get started on setting them up.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Sounds like you've got it figured out. Thank you for providing examples that help make IoT seem to have some realworld applications. Up until now, it seemed like a parlor trick to me. Keep us posted on how things go.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brittany View Post
    Thanks for all the helpful input. I am a DIYer and buying used aids, which is why I was looking at the Linx2 as the 3D simply isn't selling a lot on the secondary market.

    I have decided the IFTTT capabilities truly are that important to me, as I cannot hear the doorbell in the area of the house where I spend 100% of my time, and being able to set up more functions will be a great feature (although it seems many people don't have this integration for themselves, for me it will be a game changer.) My security system can alert me to motion outside, someone pulling in the drive, package deliveries, text messages from my daughter, emails from specific people, etc.

    The other thing is the difference in programming, with the Oticon offering more channels and adjustability.

    I know buying used isn't the most popular option, but I suffered a spinal injury and I've been bedridden for almost five years. With a dozen hospital stays, 8 surgeries, and over 40 procedures, my medical bills are insane and I just can't afford hearing aids even at a bargain price of $4000. Used, I could buy two sets of premium, current aids for that price. Programming them is the least of my concerns, they are relatively straightforward and with the community here I have help if I run into any issues. I already have a Mini Pro so I can pretty much program any aids except those without software or that are locked out (like Costco aids.)

    Even if I hate them, I can easily get my money back out of them and buy something else for that price. The other major issue for me is I can't "just" drive to the audiologist. I leave my house one time a month, going multiple times to the audiologist just won't happen. Being able to program them myself is a must with my health situation, which also means I don't have to figure out how to describe what I'm experiencing or hearing, I can just fix it!

    They should be here in a few days and I'll be able to get started on setting them up.
    .25 .5 1 1.5 2 3.0 4.0 6.0 8.0

    15 15 20 30 30 55 75 90 NR ​KS7
    10 10 20 15 25 35 65 85 95 WRS 100/92@45/40

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